Sharp Hospital’s Distinctive Knuckle Highlights Entrance 



Sharp Hospital in San Diego, CA not only updated their medical facility to meet the changing needs of their industry and maintain their high standards but built a new hospital and wrapped it around the existing building. The new entrance, very sleek and handsome, its shape was a challenge for the installers because it was inconsistent from floor to floor. In addition, there is an S curve at the apex that tapers and goes over the roof which is visible from the freeway. The S curve was designed to shield mechanical equipment and a cat walk.

California law is changing seismic requirements for hospitals effective in 2010. Sharp Hospital in San Diego had the foresight to meet the expectations a year in advance. To achieve the necessary changes they built a new hospital and wrapped it around the old hospital and in 2009 moved all their patients to the new facility. In addition to meeting the new earthquake requirements, Sharp had an opportunity to update their facility and meet the changing needs of their industry and maintain their high standards as a medical facility. Designed by Seattle architect NBBJ, it is the first new hospital in San Diego in 15 years.

California Sheet Metal Works, El Cajon, CA installed 12,000 sq. ft. of InvariMatte® stainless steel on the knuckle, stopping and starting over a period of three years as the needs of the entire project allowed them to proceed. Jesse Lara, CSM Field Foreman at the time (now an Estimator) described the parallelogram shape and explained that the overall form curved in two directions. “To solve the radius changes from floor to floor we worked with lasers and ion sticks to determine the specific dimensions. With no plumb lines we had to figure out how to pick up a radius point and then connect the dots,” explained Lara.

Once that was determined we could then work on the layout for the panels. Further, the success of the project also hinged on the quality of the workmanship and on the mechanics of the people that built the parts.

NBBJ AIA Senior Associate, Grant Gustafson designed the project and worked to ensure that the curves only went in one direction for structural integrity and strength. We used the latest engineering technology, a 3D model process to develop the idea. “The knuckle is the building’s exclamation point and we had good trade people along with good stainless steel product made uniformly that helped the idea become reality,” explained Gustafson.

Sharp Hospital is perched between two freeways and is therefore in a glare sensitive environment. InvariMatte® is a low glare finish similar to bead blast that was designed by Contrarian Micro Textures, Allison Park, PA to bring a subtle appearance to a wider range of panel applications, including wall systems, roofing, and composite panels. Stainless steel requires minimal maintenance and is a metal that is truly sustainable, containing more than 60% recycled steel. Brain Neuffer, Project Manager for California Sheet Metal Works at the time of the project and now employed at Tower Glass explained that he recommended the use of InvariMatte® because it exceeds industry standards for being square and flat and therefore helped to ensure the success of the project.

Jeff Swain, Project Manager for Tower Glass, Santee CA, was responsible for the envelope, Jeff Lewis of Gilbane was the project contractor.
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Visionary, Sustainable Floating Conference Room is Clad in Stainless Steel 

Sometimes it’s about substance. SHW Group’s floating conference room, designed by architect, Mike Hall sits above the lobby of their atrium in Plano, Texas. The lofty conference room’s western side is covered with Stainless Steel and has a handsome finish that captures the light and reflects it, adding interest and distinction to the room.

The loft is cantilevered out into the atrium forming the office and is visible from the outside. It makes a statement when entering the atrium that was designed to interest clients as well as future employees. It is a remarkable way to add space without relocating or the expense of a major renovation. It uses less power than a roof top system. It is a very green space as it uses the natural light of the atrium, utilizes existing space and is clad in stainless steel which will stand the test of time as it is fingerprint and corrosion resistant as well as easy to clean. The soft savings of minimal maintenance should not be underestimated in these trying economic times.

The design and development of the Cube began with the branding of SHW Group two years ago. Employees were asked to put things that they valued about SHW Group into a 3” x 3” cube.

When it came time to expand our space, architect Mike Hall suggested the Cube as an idea that was a symbolic element for their organization. A team of eleven led the project and as it progressed a sonnet was written by Ellis Heitzke-Kirkdorffer. The sonnet appears below to add a rare personal glimpse into the creative development.

SHW Group’s entrance has 2-1/2 story volume and the cube added interest visible both inside and outside the atrium. The cube is 22’ x 22’, has glass on 3 sides and stainless steel on the other. It is 10’ above the floor, 12’ in height, high enough, yet low enough to draw interest. Sound is absorbed with a textile ceiling and carpeting. Mecho shades are used on the windows to diffuse the light.

When researching finishes, what caught the SHW Group material coordinator’s attention was that fact CMT's product was 80% recycled stainless steel. “It almost looks like a mosaic; there is a lot of movement in the material that reflects well, which adds to the room,” explained Mr. Hall.

SHW Group is currently LEED Silver on their space. LEED certification provides independent, third-party verification that a building project meets the highest green building and performance measures.

The stainless steel used is rated best for corrosion resistance, cleanability and fingerprint resistance. It has better visual uniformity and good flatness for installation. Contrarian Micro Textures in Pennsylvania distributes the product. According to Jim Halliday, of Contrarian Micro Textures, “This product has a remarkable finish with a variety of facets in the surface that create a dramatic effect from reflected light. It sparkles as you walk past it.”

“The finish looks architectural grade,” says Randy Richenberger, of Eklund’s, Inc., the installer on the project. “It is a very attractive metal, a great substitute for standard stainless steel for not much more money that brings out that architectural element,” he added.
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Contrarian Micro Textures' InvariMatte® Stainless Steel Finish Plays Vital Role in New LA Arts High School: Time Tested Product Helps Architects Achieve their Vision 

The proprietary stainless steel matte finish, InvariMatte®, from Contrarian Micro Textures is helping to create an architectural crown jewel in downtown Los Angeles – the dazzling new Los Angeles High School for the Visual and Performing Arts, also known as Central L.A. High School # 9.

In a city highly regarded for its role in the arts, the seven-structure, five-acre campus, with space for 1,600-students, is a prized asset of L.A.’s ongoing Grand Avenue project—which, when finished, will comprise part of a cluster of cultural attractions and architectural wonders, such as the Museum of Contemporary Art, the Walt Disney Concert Hall, the Los Angeles Music Center, and the Colburn School for Performing Arts. The new school is located at 450 N. Grand Avenue.

A total of 50,000 square feet of Contrarian’s InvariMatte® stainless steel finish was employed to meet the architect’s vision for a bead blasted appearance on the exterior panels for three sections of the high school: a next-generation library dubbed the “Space of Knowledge” and placed in the center of the school courtyard, rising as a truncated, asymmetrical cone with an ocular window aimed at the sky, and sheathed in InvariMatte® stainless steel shingles; the striking entrance, consisting of a framed glass atrium surrounded by Alcoa’s exceptionally crafted Reynobond® InvariMatte® composite panels; and a helix that arches skyward over the 101 Freeway at Grand Avenue, providing a spectacular landmark visible from northern Los Angeles.

The shingles for the library were fabricated and installed by CMF, INC. (Custom Metal Fabricators) of Orange, CA. Diamond Perforating of Visalia, CA perforated the helix screen and CMF, INC. fabricated and installed the 1/8-inch InvariMatte® stainless steel perforated screen.

“Contrarian’s InvariMatte® finish was chosen for several important reasons,” said Glenn Meyer, Project Manager with CMF, INC. “Obviously, this is a project of stunning beauty and extraordinary vision on the part of the architects, and InvariMatte® gave us a superior product over the standard bead blasted stainless steel. The consistency and quality of the finish helped us achieve the project’s aesthetic objectives. In addition, InvariMatte®’s stainless steel attributes mean that it provides a ‘slam-dunk’ life cycle cost savings that can’t be beat.”

InvariMatte® is a non-directional, low gloss, uniformly textured stainless steel finish designed for use in architectural applications. It is often used when a bead blasted stainless steel is specified. While it's lower reflectivity lends itself to roofing applications, it can be applied to wall panels, coping and trim. The superb consistency of this finish results in excellent panel-to-panel matching. Since InvariMatte® has no coatings to deteriorate, it will last indefinitely with little maintenance. Because stainless steel is dimensionally stable up to 2000-degrees Fahrenheit, InvariMatte® provides an added measure of protection in the event of a fire.

“InvariMatte® is a remarkable product that provides a sustainable, low glare appearance with outstanding finish consistency,” said Jim Halliday, of Contrarian Micro Textures. “Unlike painted metal, InvariMatte®’s finely textured finish will stand the test of time without fading, all the while delivering stainless steel’s remarkable resistance to corrosion.”

The architect for the new high school is Coop Himmelb(l)au, with HMC Architects serving as executive architect. The most visible design element of the school is a steel tower, enveloped in a spiraling ribbon.

The Los Angeles High School for the Visual and Performing Arts, set for completion in 2008, will provide space for four academies for education in music, dance, theater arts and visual arts. It also will provide the community with a 1,000-seat theater open to the public. The new school’s proximity to important cultural institutions was a key factor in the development of the school’s mission and design. The school, like the Grand Avenue project as a whole, received considerable support from billionaire philanthropist and arts champion Eli Broad.

Contrarian Micro Textures and one of its partners, Tsukiboshi Art Co. Ltd of Hyogo, Japan, will take part in a tour of the new school hosted by the USC Architectural Guild on Saturday, June 28, at 9:30 a.m. Jim Halliday, of Contrarian Micro Textures, and Takayuki Tokunaga, Managing Director of Tsukiboshi Art Co. Ltd., will represent each company. Contrarian Micro Textures and Tsukiboshi Art Co. Ltd. deliver architectural support in coined, embossed and advanced vacuum vapor deposition colorized stainless steel.

The invitation to attend the tour was first made by Dottie O’Carroll, Executive Director for Development of the USC School of Architecture while attending the AIA Conference in Boston earlier this year. For more information about the USC Architectural Guild, contact its executive director, Zelda Wong, or visit their website.

Contrarian Micro Textures offers an unrivaled selection of finishes in stainless steel, and titanium designed for architectural applications, and custom finish solutions, and application engineering assistance. Architectural finishes from Contrarian Micro Textures can be used for a variety of applications including roofing and wall panel systems, composite panels, elevators, coping, trim, flashing, doors and counter tops.
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Contrarian Micro Textures' Popular InvariMatte® Roster Expands Product Line with New InvariMatte® Black Stainless Steel Finish 



Contrarian Micro Textures, a Pittsburgh-based, high-performance architectural metals company serving clients throughout the world, has just added another InvariMatte® stainless steel finish to its roster of products: InvariMatte® Black, a non-directional, uniformly textured finish with a thin black oxide film. The lineup of InvariMatte® stainless steel finishes has proved popular in many market sectors and, in particular, has allowed Contrarian Micro Textures to gain a strong foothold in the airport construction market.

InvariMatte® Black is designed for use in many architectural applications, and can be applied to roofing and wall panels, as well as coping and trim. The black chromium oxide film is produced electrochemically in collaboration with Prismatic Stainless Steel, a division of B & M Finishers, Inc.

“Unlike blackened zinc or painted metals, InvariMatte® Black offers a rich dark finish that will last indefinitely, since the oxide film does not react to ultraviolet light or atmospheric conditions”, said Jim Halliday, of Contrarian Micro Textures.

Metal, particularly stainless steel, is showing up more frequently on newly-constructed airport exteriors across the country. The trend marks an important juncture for airport construction specifiers mindful that some metal products are less suitable for airport settings than others – those that have reflective properties, require paint, or corrode when exposed to jet fuel emissions. Not so with Contrarian Micro Textures’ InvariMatte®, a corrosion-resistant, uncoated stainless steel finish with low glare and a long lifecycle.

In addition to sun, wind, and precipitation, airport exteriors are continually exposed to jet fuel residue, earth-rumbling engines and the repercussions of heavy traffic. The materials used to construct these exteriors must stand up to these elements and maintain an aesthetic standard. Stainless steel accomplishes both goals.

InvariMatte resists the threat of corrosion from atmospheric conditions and trapped moisture.

Data collected from the Nickel Development Institute indicates that aluminum, a common alternative to stainless steel, corrodes several times faster. While a layer of paint is effective for extending the life of an aluminum panel, it can actually have a detrimental effect on corrosion resistance if that layer is breached and moisture is trapped at the metal interface. Incidental damage to roof panels – punctures in the paint, or dents and dings – can easily occur from routine maintenance or weather events, such as hailstorms. If moisture and contaminants – like sulfur dioxide and chlorides – are trapped at the metal surface, rapid deterioration, known as crevice corrosion, will occur.

With InvariMatte®, no paint is needed, allowing the natural beauty of stainless steel to shine through.

“Prismatic helped us respond to customers who wanted a sustainable black finish,” said Halliday. “More common stainless steel finishes are rather bright and remain so after electrochemical colorizing. The dull InvariMatte® finish remains dull when colorized, creating a desirable surface appearance. The combination of our InvariMatte® finish with Prismatic’s workmanship create a unique product solution that is being well-received by designers.”

Aside from physical damage done to them, painted surfaces do not stand up well in an airport environment because of jet fuel residue. Kerosene-based fuels will act as solvents when particles come in contact with painted exteriors. While some floor paint formulations are resistant to jet fuel, none is available for coil-coated applications. More to the point, however, is the fact that “resistance” to jet fuel does not equate with “imperviousness.” The InvariMatte® finish is able to make the claim that it is impervious to jet fuel.

Low Glare
In addition to being visually uniform, Contrarian Micro Textures’ InvariMatte® has low reflectivity compared to typical stainless steel finishes. For that reason, it can be used on airports as prominently visible exterior walls and roofs with no risk of glare or reflection that could compromise a pilot’s sight. InvariMatte® has lower gloss (<20 at 85 degrees) than many paint finishes.

Reflectivity is a concern not only for pilots and airport personnel but also for those who live and work in surrounding high-rise buildings and condominiums. “InvariMatte® is a sensible choice as a cladding material in dense urban environments,” said Halliday. “While all stainless steel addresses corrosion and paint failure concerns due to smog and jet fuel residue, some stainless steel finishes are just too bright to be used in glare-sensitive locations like transportation centers.”

Low Life Cycle Cost
Considering the high cost of service disruption at an air terminal, not to mention security issues, a permanent stainless steel roof system is a logical and cost-effective choice. While titanium will perform beautifully from a sustainability standpoint, it can be expensive in comparison to stainless steel. Likewise, a less costly alternative, aluminum, painted or not, requires maintenance or replacement at some point during its lifecycle, which makes it more costly overall.

The appropriate grade of InvariMatte® stainless steel can be expected to last the useful life of an air terminal building with little maintenance. Gutters should be kept clear and panels may need to be cleaned for cosmetic reasons, but these are minimal necessities as compared to alternative products.

Airport Projects
Contrarian Micro Textures’ stainless steel matte finish, InvariMatte®, is being used for the 280,000-square-foot roof during phase one of a terminal project at Raleigh-Durham International Airport—and it will be used for another 107,000 square feet of roof for phase two.

This $570-million project follows the announcement in November 2007 that Contrarian’s InvariMatte® finish is being used in the construction of what will become the world’s largest stainless steel roof at the New Doha International Airport in the State of Qatar.

The new Doha airport will partially open in 2009—with completion set for 2015. At 2.1 million square feet, the new roof will exceed in size the currently largest stainless steel roof of the Kuala Lumpur International Airport (1.614 million square feet).

Contrarian Micro Textures’ stainless steel finishes have been installed in a wide number of applications, including other airport projects in Dallas-Fort Worth, Atlanta, Detroit, Scottsdale, AZ, and the Jamaica AirTrain JFK Terminal.

Airport projects specify Contrarian Micro Textures’ stainless steel finishes primarily for their aesthetic value, glare resistance, and longevity.

InvariMatte® Black is a non-directional, uniformly textured stainless steel finish with a thin black oxide film designed for use in architectural applications. It can be applied to roofing and wall panels, as well as coping and trim. The black chromium oxide film is produced electrochemically in collaboration with Prismatic Stainless Steel, Division of B&M Finishers, Inc. Unlike paints coatings, the finish is not reactive to ultraviolet light. InvariMatte® Black retains the corrosion resistance of the underlying T304 alloy. InvariMatte® Black is readily welded or soldered. However, exposure to high temperatures will destroy the black oxide film.
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World’s Largest Stainless Steel Roof to Feature InvariMatte® Finish from CMT 



The proprietary matte finish, InvariMatte®, from Contrarian Micro Textures is being used in the construction of what will become the world’s largest stainless steel roof at the New Doha International Airport in the State of Qatar. The new airport will partially open in 2009—with completion set for 2015. At 2.1 million square feet (or about 195,000 square meters), the new roof will exceed in size the currently largest stainless steel roof of the Kuala Lumpur International Airport (1.614 million square feet or about 150,000 square meters).

The Doha airport specified that Contrarian supply its InvariMatte® stainless steel finish for its aesthetic value and glare resistance.

In 2009, the new airport will be able to serve a capacity of 24 million passengers a year. In 2015, the figure will rise to 50 million passengers. The airport will occupy a land mass in excess of about 8.5 square miles (22 square kilometers).

Renowned architect HOK (Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum) designed the airport terminal. Bechtel is the general contractor. Bemo USA is manufacturing and installing the roof panels.

“Bemo does a great job of executing large scale roofing projects in high-performance metals like stainless steel,” said Jim Halliday, of Contrarian Micro Textures. “Their ability to mobilize anywhere in the world is impressive.”

Rick Kovach, President of Bemo USA, said, “This entire project is on a scale that’s hard for most people to comprehend, even veterans of the construction industry. It requires both excellent products and problem-free service — and we’re getting those from Contrarian.”

InvariMatte® is a non-directional, low gloss, uniformly textured stainless steel finish designed for use in architectural applications. While it's lower reflectivity lends itself to roofing applications, it can be applied to wall panels, coping and trim. The superb consistency of this finish results in excellent panel-to-panel matching. Since InvariMatte® has no coatings to deteriorate, it will last indefinitely with little maintenance. InvariMatte® is readily welded or soldered and available in coils and cut lengths up to 288 inches and widths ranging from 0.75 to 49 inches. Because stainless steel is dimensionally stable up to 2000-degrees Fahrenheit, InvariMatte® provides an added measure of protection in the event of a fire.

“InvariMatte® is a remarkable product that provides a sustainable, low glare appearance with excellent finish consistency’” said Halliday. “Other stainless steel finishes are simply too reflective to use in a glare-sensitive environment. Whereas painted metal may address the glare issue, InvariMatte®’s finely textured finish will stand the test of time without fading, all the while delivering stainless steel’s remarkable resistance to corrosion.”
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